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    « Standing in awe -- and uncertainty -- in revolutionary Boston | Main | Writing life makes me a lucky man -- my favorite articles »

    September 30, 2009

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    Relax Max

    Perhaps I should revisit Thoreau with a less cynical mind. I may. Thank you for this post.

    AM

    This is truly moving, and thanks so much for sharing.

    "I wanted to live deep and suck out the marrow of life"

    There is no other way to live.

    Jonathon Flaum

    In his conclusion to Walden, Thoreau wrote: "there is an incessant influx of novelty into the world, and yet we tolerate incredible dullness." the novelty is our authentic human voice. Thank you Chris, for sharing yours with us. It brings me closer to what matters.

    Jonathon

    Cassandra Frear

    I enjoyed your post about Walden Pond and your letter to Thoreau. He made a powerful impact on your life -- impossible to measure. There are writers that have been that way for me, too. C.S. Lewis is one example. I just picked up a large anthology of John Muir's reflections. I admire the way he brought a spiritual awareness to his descriptions of the natural world.

    Kierra

    Thanks for sharing this post! Thoreau has had the same effect on my life, and I have been revisiting him as I make some big changes to my life. www.apumpkintomyself.blogspot.com

    Rob

    Great post. I find him to be somewhat inaccessible but I think I will take another shot!

    Paula Little

    I'm so jealous! What an amazing adventure--thanks for sharing. Looking forward to more...

    Hannah Lee Jones

    Hi Christopher: I am also a life-long admirer of Thoreau and am inspired by the story of your pilgrimage. I have yet to make one myself, but dream of doing that soon, and know that when it happens I will be as moved as you were. You wrote such a beautiful letter to our hero! And what affected me most about it was that evidently I am not the only person who has been writing to Henry. You seem like a busy individual, but if you happen to have a little time for tea each morning, I post daily letters to our friend on my blog at http://letterstohenry.wordpress.com/. Best wishes! -Hannah

    michael jameson

    as the greatest teacher of the human condition through nature i have been a student and writer of thoreau since i wandered off and lived in the woods alone for a year after reading a story about a boy that had read thoreau and done the same for several months, the book was called ''my side of the mountain'' ,i was only 12 or 13,i new hunger and ended my journey due to a great loneliness,but all that experience made me the man i am today,and can never live to far from nature,thoreau has given mankind the tools to live a great life,anew life filled with wonderment and music,read and reflect upon his teachings it is the greatest gift you can give yourself. mike jameson oldantiqueguy@hotmail.com

    Chris

    Thank you for sharing that story. I continue to be amazed by how huge is the universe of people who Thoreau continues to touch even today. I hope other people follow your suggestion and give themselves the gift of getting to know Mr. Thoreau.

    michael jameson

    i know thoreau now as i know myself,once in every so many years a man comes along that can look at himself from the outside,he questions,makes observations,and reflects,a worthiness of sharing,teaching,for the good of all.let each man make a journey of himself,he knows the truth and if he lives it,he has happiness. michael jameson oldantiqueguy@hotmail.com

    A.M.

    This really will Thoreau your emotions around

    M

    I unconditionally agree that his writings and philosophy have a huge reach, but I don't think his tombstone size is at as puzzling as you make it ou to be. It is an embodiment and testament to the simplicity with which he strove to live, a deliberate act that was not undone by those who took care to prepare him after his departure from this world. Rather than question this in a negative light, this simple stone ought to be recognized as the ultimate testimonial to his fidelity to his guiding credence that he shared with other through his powerful and influential literary voice.

    Chris L

    M -- your point is a very good one and one I had not considered. That makes me consider the tomb stone in a different light. Thank you for sharing the thought.

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